5 reasons to consider a sectional for your space

Buying new living room furniture? Before you automatically start browsing the sofas and chairs, take some time to consider a sectional first. It seems many people are hesitant to buy a sectional and I’m not sure why. Maybe it is due to their larger size, or maybe people are just hesitant to try something new, fearing they will regret it later. While not for everyone, I think there’s a lot to love about sectionals. Read on to learn the benefits of sectionals and you might just realize you love them, too.

1. They are perfectly designed for taking naps

Let’s start off with one of the great advantages, in my opinion, because who doesn’t love a good nap? While sofas allow one person to take a snooze, anyone else in the house who wants to relax for a bit has to try and get comfortable in a small chair. Sectionals are big enough to allow more than one person to stretch out and get some rest on a lazy Saturday.

2. You can use a sectional to define your space
Photo credit: Insterior

Photo credit: Insterior

If you have an open floor plan, creating defined spaces is the only way to prevent your home from feeling like one big room. With their long and often L-shaped form, sectionals are a great way to separate the living room from other areas, such as the dining room.

3. Sectionals are versatile
Photo credit: Thimble Blossoms by Camille Roskelley

Photo credit: Thimble Blossoms by Camille Roskelley

 

Most sectionals separate into two or more pieces. If you ever get tired of your living room’s arrangement or move into a space where a sectional doesn’t work, you can break apart the pieces and use them separately.

4. Your guests have a place to sit 

Not only do sofas provide more room for napping, but they also offer more places to sit. The next time you host a party, you’ll finally have enough room for all of your guests without bringing in the old folding chairs.

5. They save space 
Photo credit: The Little Corner

Photo credit: The Little Corner

Most people wouldn’t think that sectionals save space since they are larger than chairs or sofas, but trust me, they can. Sectionals can be arranged to fit in tight corners, and you won’t have to buy additional seating, either.

As you can see, sectionals offer many benefits that make them a great choice for the living room. It might even be the best option for your space!

By Wendy Weinert

Should sofas be placed against the wall?

When arranging a living room, it’s often best to place the sofa first. Where will you put it? For years homeowners and renters have been setting up their sofas against the wall. It seems like such a natural spot! But there are designers who say that sofas should “float” and that placing one against the wall is a rookie mistake. So what’s the best arrangement? Well, that might depend on your preference and space.

Keep these considerations in mind when choosing the perfect spot for your sofa.

The room’s size

Photo credit: Pinterest

Photo credit: Pinterest

If you have a large, spacious living room, placing your sofa in the middle can keep the room from looking bare. A small living room, on the other hand, might appear larger with the sofa placed against the wall.

Your home’s layout

Photo Credit: Hemingway and Hepburn

Photo Credit: Hemingway and Hepburn

With open-floor layouts, it’s important that each room is clearly defined with furniture. If you don’t have walls separating rooms, float your sofa to create one. You can also use your sofa to create a clear walking path and direct traffic.

Living room activities

Photo credit: Apartment Therapy

Photo credit: Apartment Therapy

Sofas can also be used to define areas within the living room. If you want to use one half of your room for movie watching and the other half as a game room for the kids, use your sofa to divide the two areas.

Wall decor

Photo credit: Home-Dzine

Photo credit: Home-Dzine

A long unadorned wall can cause a room to look incomplete. If your wall needs that something extra to keep it from looking bare, push your sofa against it. You can also float the sofa just a little bit off the wall for a similar effect.

Other living room furniture

Photo Credit: Cote de Texas

Photo Credit: Cote de Texas

Sometimes a sofa can look great both off and against the wall; if this is the case in your space, then its placement is a matter of personal preference. What is important, however, is that you don’t push all of your furniture against the wall. People often do this, not realizing that it looks uninviting to guests and makes conversing rather difficult.

What about you? Do you think sofas should be placed against the wall? Write a comment and let us know!

By Wendy Weinert

Sofas, couches, davenports – What’s the difference?

I’m sure many of you grew up like I did thinking that sofas, couches and davenports were all the same thing. I’ve always thought they were synonyms you could use interchangeably and that certain regions in the U.S. preferred one word over the other, much like soda vs. pop. You can imagine my surprise, though, when I discovered that the words sofa, couch and davenport in fact have three separate meanings.

Couches

Fainting couch

Photo credit: South Shore Decorating Blog

Although invented prior to this time, couches became very popular in the Victorian era when they were referred to as a “fainting couch.” Couches during the Victorian period were usually armless and most often used by women wearing corsets who needed a resting place to catch their breath.

Sofas

Emerald Home Furnishings Grey Carleton Nail Head Sofa Sofa is said to have come from the Arabic term “suffah.” Originally, the word was used to describe a bench with arms and cushions. It was designed just for sitting, while the couch was created for both sitting and lying.

Davenports

Davenport

Photo credit: Spanish Hills

The word davenport actually describes a specific type of sofa, made by the manufacturing company A. H. Davenport and Company. Davenports were similar to futons, as they could be converted into a bed. Today it’s hard to tell the difference between a couch, sofa and davenport. While doing research, I came across numerous definitions and opinions that often contradicted each other. For example, some agree that sofas are more formal than couches and are mostly used for special occasions. Others say size matters and that sofas are typically larger than couches. The word davenport is often used to describe any sleeper-sofa, regardless of the manufacturing company. Additionally, many have decided that their former definitions no longer hold true and the three terms can be used interchangeably. What about you? Do you use the words couch, sofa and davenport to describe different pieces of furniture, or do you use one word over the others due to your upbringing? Tell us your story! By Wendy Weinert