Buying a ceiling fan part two: matching your preferences

Buying a ceiling fan part two: matching your preferences

In my last post about ceiling fans, you learned how to match a fan to your room’s size and ceiling height. Now it’s time to dive into the fun stuff! Choose a fan that will complement your room’s style and your own personal preferences by considering these three factors.

Buying a ceiling fan part two: matching your preferences

Style

Ceiling fans used to be fairly boring, but all that has changed in recent years. Now there is a wide selection to choose from and you can select a design to be casual, elegant, rustic or modern. Along with newer, creative designs, ceiling fans have also improved due to a larger selection of finishes. From black to bronze, there are an array of options to match your taste and existing décor. While looking at finishes, know that many fans come with reversible blades that allow you to change the look of your fan. Just make sure that both finishes fit in well with your space before making a final decision.

Buying a ceiling fan part two: matching your preferences

Function

Think about what you want and need your fan to do before making a final decision. Do you need your fan to have a light? If so, choose a fan that comes with a light fixture, or at least one that can be modified using a light kit. Would you prefer to have multiple speeds available? Then make sure to have a fan that can be adjusted. If you want to have your fan help distribute even heating during cooler months, find a fan that can run in reverse. It’s important that the ceiling fan you choose will meet your daily needs and preferences.

Buying a ceiling fan part two: matching your preferences

Convenience

Ceiling fans used to be adjusted by pulling a string or cord, but now most fans come with either a wall switch or remote control. Even those that don’t can often be modified if you don’t want to mess with a cord. Wall controls make it easy for you to adjust a ceiling fan upon entering or leaving a room, but remote controls allow you to adjust the fan without getting up from a couch or bed. Decide which convenience you prefer, or choose both options instead.

Overall, choose a ceiling fan to complement your room and taste. The right ceiling fan can do wonders for your home’s style and atmosphere.

By Wendy Weinert

 

Ceiling Fans Vs. Air Conditioning: A Story of Energy-efficiency, Cost Savings and Style

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As individuals in a society that is striving to move away from wasteful energy consumption and towards sustainable energy conservation and cost savings, we are always looking for ways to do our part.  Many of us have analyzed our household lighting, electronics, and appliance usage, and made adjustments to conserve energy and save money.  Similarly, it is to our benefit, and the benefit of society as a whole, that we take a close look at the cooling systems in our homes and determine if there are changes we can make to conserve energy and financial resources; more often than not, there are.

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During warmer seasons of the year, we all want to maintain a cool, comfortable atmosphere in our homes.  For many of us, that means turning on the air conditioner, expending a significant amount of energy, and paying high costs to do so.  While air conditioning certainly has its place and makes for an appropriate cooling option at times, the benefits of ceiling fan usage either alone, or in conjunction with air conditioning, can offer many significant energy and cost saving advantages.  Consider that a ceiling fan by a manufacturer like Fanimation uses as few as 30 watts during operation, while a central air conditioning system can use upwards of 5,000 watts.  Additionally, ceiling fans when used properly regulate air circulation in a room.  Setting a fan to spin counter clockwise sends cooler air downward, making the room’s occupants feel up to four degrees cooler.  In warmer months, this means you can conserve energy and save money by turning up/off the thermostat on your air conditioning.  In cooler months, you can set the ceiling fan back to clockwise and still enjoy all of its air circulating benefits.

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The use of ceiling fans is so effective at reducing energy consumption that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends using them to reduce or eliminate the need to use air conditioning.  In an effort to motivate every American to reduce energy consumption by turning off their central air conditioning systems and relying solely on fans, Fanimation is initiating National Ceiling Fan Day (“NCFD”) on September 18, 2013.  Full participation would result in a savings of over three trillion kilowatts hours of energy consumption!  NCFD will go a long way towards raising awareness about how ceiling fans can fit into an overall energy and cost savings plan.

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It comes as little surprise that Fanimation is taking the lead on raising awareness about ceiling fans.  Fanimation pushes the boundaries of ceiling fan technology and their fans offers some distinct advantages over conventional ceiling fans.  Fanimation offers a large selection of fans with DC motors, which generate more power/torque than conventional fans while consuming 70% of the power.  DC motor fans are also lighter, require less electrical energy, offer six speeds with reverse technology and are virtually silent, among numerous other benefits.  Many Fanimation ceiling fans also come with the prestigious ENERGY STAR rating, which the Department of Energy bestows upon the most energy efficient appliances and building products.  Fanimation’s Islander Collection ceiling fans boast the prestigious ENERGY STAR rating and DC motors, while offering a touch of the tropics via an eye-catching design narrative.  The Fanimation Zonix Wet Collection is also notable for its ENERGY STAR rating, as well as a modern, sophisticated style.

As you think of ways to conserve energy, reduce your costs, and add a touch of style to your home, consider the use of ceiling fans and all of the wonderful ways in which they will benefit your household.

Inspired lighting for children

For most parents, decorating a child’s bedroom or playroom is a joy. It’s a place to inject a bit of whimsy and fun vivid hues you may not consider for other areas of the house. Although you’ll likely put a lot of thought into the design concepts and themes behind your child’s room, many parents overlook lighting.

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Lighting for children should blend both functionality and style. Rather than settle for a bland single bulb in a clear glass globe, use lighting to bring the room’s design to new heights. A striking light fixture is not only a great design opportunity to inspire little minds as they play pretend or fall into dreamland, but also can be the final touch that creates a perfect, polished look.

Here are a few children’s lighting trends that are sure to inspire:

Ceiling fans: Selecting a ceiling fan for your child’s room is probably driven by function, but today’s ceiling fans are far from boring. Made from numerous types of woods, metals or even fabric, and in just about any shape you can imagine, the blades of a ceiling fan reveal the fixture’s true design potential. From staggered ovals of various sizes in chrome to oil rubbed bronze blades that look like palm leaves, ceiling fan blade options are endless.Kids_Crystorama

Chandeliers: If you’re designing a nursery or a little girl’s room, you can’t go wrong with a crystal chandelier. The is the perfect example of elegance without going overboard. Think chandeliers aren’t for little boys? Modern designs that incorporate clean lines and cool-toned metals are ideal, like the Crystorama Lighting Group Solaris Olde Silver Three-Light Chandelier.

Transitional: Transitional style fixtures can be a good option for children’s spaces. Not only are transitional styles great for just about any color palette or theme you’ve selected, they offer great longevity. So when your little lad or lass isn’t’ so little, the piece can continue to be used, even when you update the room’s décor.

EASY-BREEZY DAY TRIP: THE ANTIQUE FAN MUSEUM

If you’re looking for a cool summer destination, why not take a spin to the Antique Fan Museum? Just a half-hour’s drive from Indianapolis, the Antique Fan Museum in Zionsville, Indiana, is a treasure trove featuring more than 450 antique ceiling and desk fans. It’s located at the headquarters of Fanimation, Inc., the premier ceiling and desk fan manufacturer renowned for original and reproduction fans. The museum’s collection represents more than 140 manufacturers dating back to the early 1800s, making it the perfect gathering place for decorative arts enthusiasts, gearheads and fan aficionados of all ages. Plus it’s the only museum of its kind that’s open to the public, which makes it a fun and unique experience.

Museum Grand Opening Videomuseum_entrance

Turnaround Time

The museum was first launched by the Antique Fan Collectors Association (AFCA) in 1997, displaying fans acquired by its members. In 2008, the AFCA moved the museum to its current location at the invitation of Fanimation founder and CEO, Tom Frampton. Since age 17, when he repaired his first vintage fan while employed by an antiques dealer, he’s been an avid fan collector. Through his extensive world travels, Tom has curated a captivating collection of antique fans, which are now on exhibit.

A Revolutionary Collection

At the Antique Fan Museum, you’ll discover every kind of fan imaginable. Some are true curiosities; others are works of incomparable ingenuity; and each is a link with the past. Check out designs ranging from ephemeral hand-held advertising fans featuring brands, movie stars and politicians to über-durable fans for railroad cars and battleships. Explore a variety of indoor ceiling, wall, desk and pedestal fans with hot air engines, fueled by steam, lamp oil and—break out your flask—alcohol. And be on the lookout for surprises, like early coin-operated fans used in hotels and one of the world’s oldest electric desk fans, circa the early 1890s.

Air Apparent

After you’ve toured the museum, linger in the lobby to learn about the history of Fanimation and to see fans inspired by Tom’s personal collection. These exquisite reproduction models unite authentic vintage styling with modern safety and control features to create fans that represent the ultimate in character, comfort and convenience.

Style You Can Bank On: The Fargo

Fargo Application

Back in the 1920s, bankers, brokers and lawyers needed fans that would help them stay cool without blowing away their stacks of cash, stock certificates and legal documents. The solution then was the Savory Airator. A desktop fan featuring horizontal blades in a gilt cage, the Airator created lateral air movement that left their papers unruffled. Re-envisioned by Tom as The Fargo, this safer and more efficient desktop fan offers three speed settings, creating maximum comfort while your communiqués stay put. Available in satin-nickel finish with chrome accents, oil-rubbed bronze with antique brass accents, and burgundy faux leather with brushed brass accents, the Fargo adds the perfect touch to home or office décor.

All That Jazz: The Fitzgerald

Fitzgerald Application

F. Scott Fitzgerald is often quoted as saying “There are no second acts in American lives.” But even The Great Gatsby author would have to agree that Tom and the team at Fanimation transformed the legendary Robbins & Myers Peacock fan, originally designed in 1933, into a thoroughly modern marvel. Uniting speakeasy styling with the latest technology and safety features, The Fitzgerald offers three speed settings, breezy oscillating motion and elegant satin nickel or oil rubbed bronze finishes. Equally at home on the wall and tabletop, The Fitzgerald is a versatile performer and powerful second act.

 Now You See It, Now You Don’t: The Air Shadow

Inspired by one of Tom’s favorite vintage ceiling fans, The Air Shadow is composed of four curved blades, combining a striking silhouette and a 43-inch sweep. When the Air Shadow isn’t in use, the blades retract, presenting a different yet equally compelling profile. A handy remote control operates the fan at three forward and reverse speeds, plus you can dim or brighten the light at the touch of a button.

Take another look and discover fans in both an old yet new light.

The Details

Fanimation Museum Brochure

The Antique Fan Museum
Address: 10983 Bennett Parkway, Zionville, IN 46077
Hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–4 PM, or by appointment at 317.733.4113.