Marriage and the merging of your households

 

You said “I Do” and enjoyed a wonderful honeymoon with your new hubby, but now comes the hard part: cohabitation! The idea of living in a new home with your spouse might be exciting, but the process of merging two households and meshing two different personalities can cause even the best couples to bicker. I bet even the infamous Kim Kardashian and Kanye West (or should I say “Kimye”) fight from time to time – even though you wouldn’t know it from their Vogue cover shoot.  Moving in with your new spouse doesn’t have to be a nightmare. Consider these tips to keep bickering and stress at a minimum.  1. Look for ways to compromise  You like the color green, but your husband likes blue. You want a sofa while your spouse prefers sectionals. Even if you agree on very little, you can still move in together successfully by compromising. Let him have his sectional so you can paint the walls green, or meet in the middle and make decisions you can agree on together.  2. When buying new items, shop together  To prevent having to make returns, make all of your major purchase decisions together. Your husband will appreciate being included and you can feel good about buying new furniture that you both enjoy.  3. Get rid of duplicate items  There’s only so much room in one house and there’s no point in having two sets of tableware or two large sofas taking over your living room. Before you actually move, go through all of your household items and furnishings to decide what you’ll keep and what can be sold, donated or thrown out. Be practical when making these decisions. If your husband has the better blender, there’s no reason for you to keep yours.  4. Allow yourself time to adjust  Moving into a new place with different furniture and décor is a huge change and you’re going to need time to adjust. Even if you don’t like some of your husband’s stuff or decorative choices now, you might grow to like or even love them in the future.

Photo credit: Vogue

You said “I Do” and enjoyed a wonderful honeymoon with your new hubby, but now comes the hard part: cohabitation! The idea of living in a new home with your spouse might be exciting, but the process of merging two households and meshing two different personalities can cause even the best couples to bicker. I bet even the infamous Kim Kardashian and Kanye West (or should I say “Kimye”) fight from time to time – even though you wouldn’t know it from their Vogue cover shoot.

Moving in with your new spouse doesn’t have to be a nightmare. Consider these tips to keep bickering and stress at a minimum.

Marriage and the merging of your households

1. Look for ways to compromise

You like the color green, but your husband likes blue. You want a sofa while your spouse prefers sectionals. Even if you agree on very little, you can still move in together successfully by compromising. Let him have his sectional so you can paint the walls green, or meet in the middle and make decisions you can agree on together.

Marriage and the merging of your households

2. When buying new items, shop together

To prevent having to make returns, make all of your major purchase decisions together. Your husband will appreciate being included and you can feel good about buying new furniture that you both enjoy.

3. Get rid of duplicate items

There’s only so much room in one house and there’s no point in having two sets of tableware or two large sofas taking over your living room. Before you actually move, go through all of your household items and furnishings to decide what you’ll keep and what can be sold, donated or thrown out. Be practical when making these decisions. If your husband has the better blender, there’s no reason for you to keep yours.

Marriage and the merging of your households

4. Allow yourself time to adjust

Moving into a new place with different furniture and décor is a huge change and you’re going to need time to adjust. Even if you don’t like some of your husband’s stuff or decorative choices now, you might grow to like or even love them in the future.

By Wendy Weinert